Israel Ed. Initiative

A Little Girl's Pendant - A Personal Note for Yom Ha'shoa

By Vavi Toran

On Friday night I watched on Israeli TV an incredible news story related to Yom Ha’shoa - Holocaust Memorial Day. The story was about a Jewish-German girl murdered in the Holocaust, whose pendant was recently found at the site of the Sobibor death camp in Poland. The story broke out a few months ago, but recently there were some new developments. Not only did the researchers identify who that girl was, but they also managed to find some of her family members who did not know about each other's existence.

For me, who grew up knowing that I lost two grandparents, eight uncles and aunts and many more relatives to a similar faith, it was a moving moment. Very few memories were shared with me by my father and two surviving aunts, all of whom have left Europe before the war. The only mementos I have are a handful of fading photos on the back of which my aunt scribbled, upon my request, the names of all of them and added “all killed by the Nazis, may their names and memories be wiped off (“Yimach sh’mam ve’zichram”).  I was therefore very moved by the story of a small object like that pendant, which brought to life seventy years later a little girl named Karoline Cohn and which has the power to unite a family.

May her memory and the memories of all who perished be blessed

The story in the news:

Ha'aretz

Israeli TV article and broadcast. In Hebrew

Educational Resources for Purim

Shalom all and Happy Adar!

I am doing some Spring cleaning ahead of Passover. This is not your usual inspection for the evasive chametz nor is it just to get rid of tchotchkes and other accumulating junk. It is a web-based Spring cleaning. Jewish LearningWorks is retiring its old web pages and I was told that if I want to capture anything I have done for the past few years that lives on the web, I better take a look right away or else it will be gone forever. Oy!…  Unlike the junk in my house, I have a real relationship with some of the stuff I have written, plagiarized or curated. So, I went straight to work and salvaged the Israel Education Initiative Newsletters from the past 3 years. And just in time for Purim, what follows below is a compilation of resources for the holiday. It was in a virtual attic, but dusted off it will shine like new.

Enjoy and Happy Purim!

Vavi Toran

 

Purim Resources
A Collection from Past IEI Newsletters
By Vavi Toran

Let's start with some fun stuff!

The story of Purim has been told throughout the centuries in many ways. From Purim Spiels to a variety of visual versions of the Megillah, writers and artists utilized their creativity to interpret the story according to their imagination and the zeitgeist of their era.  

Comix

A delightful comic book version of the Scroll of Esther was published a few years ago by the CET (The Center for Educational Technology) in Israel. The booklet is easy to follow and, besides the story itself, includes background and ideas for activities and discussion. It is in Hebrew. But hey, it's Purim and you know the story. Improvise!

Download Megillat Esther Comic Book (Available for sale from CET) 

 
 

Artistic Playing Cards

Jacob's Bible Playing Cards designed by Ze'ev Raban, a leading artist of the Bazalel Academy founded in 1906, featuring King Ahasuerus and Queen Esther among many other biblical royals. In this deck, the jack of club is Harbona, one of the seven eunuchs who served Ahasuerus and to whom the order was given to bring Queen Vashti before the king.  Now let's play! 

To See the Rest of the Deck: click here. and here.
 

Music and Videos

For young viewers, The Purim Story from Shalom Sesame.

From G-dcast, The Purim Story for Kids and Other Double Dutch Jumping Hipsters.

Purim songs with Uzi Hitman and Hani Nahmias.

Hebrew lyrics to the songs on Chagim website.

Some of the songs in English transliteration.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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   An artist stands amid effigies of Russian President Vladimir Putin and German Chancellor Angela Merkel

An artist stands amid effigies of Russian President Vladimir Putin and German Chancellor Angela Merkel

 "When Adar enters, we increase joyfulness." Babylonian Talmud Ta'anit 29a

We are doubly joyful this year since we are celebrating two months of Adar, Adar Alef (First Adar) and Adar Bet (Second Adar). Why is this?

The year in the Jewish calendar consists of twelve lunar months, but the festivals follow the solar year, since several of them (Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot) must take place in certain seasons, and the seasons are determined by the earth annual revolution around the sun. The lunar calendar is regularly adjusted to keep it in conformity with the solar year. This is done by periodically adding a second month of Adar. Since the discrepancy between the solar and lunar years amounts to 207 days every 19 years, the extra Adar is added seven times in a 19-year lunar cycle. During these leap years, most observances normally held in Adar are moved to Adar Bet, including Purim.

Masquerading and Mask Making

One of the most joyful of the holiday's customs is Masquerading and Mask Making.

"Masquerading on Purim originated about the end of the fifteenth century among the Jews of Italy, who observed and imitated the carnival practice of the Lenten season, which occurs about the time of Purim. From there it spread to all countries where Jews lived. The first known reference to the wearing of masks on Purim is found in 1508. In masquerading, people did not always wear mask. The mask was probably a much later invention, as people became more sophisticated and felt ashamed of their burlesque dress and childish tricks their "characters" were supposed to perform. Thus, to avoid recognition by their neighbors and friends and to achieve greater freedom of joyful expression, they covered their faces with masks." (from The Purim Anthology by Philip Goodman,1973)

Israeli artist, Hanoch Piven depicts the Iranian (Persian) politician known for his anti-Israel propaganda and Holocaust denial, as a modern-day Haman. The connection to Purim is achieved by using Hamantachens, a dagger, a gragger and a whip. 

Purim is a perfect opportunity to incorporate his teaching and technique to create portraits and masks for the holiday.

We hope these images, Piven's website, his TedX Jerusalem talk, and this app for face making will inspire fun Purim activities.

 

 

 

The Somber Side of the Holiday February 2015

We don't mean to spoil you rambunctious Purim spirit, but this year we cannot ignore the somber side of the holiday. Anti-Semitism is on the rise worldwide and acts of terror, violence and desecration are on the news daily. A few years ago, we commented that there are no Jewish communities in peril.  Now, thousands of European Jews are feeling vulnerable enough to seriously consider Aliyah. 

Anti-Semitism, bigotry and hate are difficult issues to discuss with students. We want to foster pride. The story of Purim as told in the Scroll of Esther offers an opportunity to examine these issues.  

 To support your effort to introduce these topics, we offer resources:
Confronting Anti-Semitism - ADL
The Scroll of Esther and Anti-Semitism - by Prof. H. Gavriyahu, JAFI
Purim and the Persian Period - JewishHistory.org
Purim: Strangest of Holidays - By Steve Israel & Noam Zion, Shalom Hartman Institute
Purim: Joy in the Midst of Uncertainty - By Rabbi Prof. David Hartman, Shalom Hartman Institute
Purim Resources for Children with Special Needs - Gateways, Access to Jewish Education

Articles

Anti-Semitism on rise across Europe 'in worst times since the Nazis' - The Guardian
Jewish leaders call for Europe-wide legislation outlawing anti-Semitism - The Guardian

Purim and Art

  Arthur Szyk -   Haman hanging on the gallows, 1950

Arthur Szyk - Haman hanging on the gallows, 1950

An Artist's View

In this version of the Esther story, Arthur Szyk portrayed himself as the interpreter of Jewish history. The artist gazes at the swastika-bedecked figure of Haman, hanging on the gallows that Haman had built to kill Mordechai. Szyk holds a hamentasch, the pastry traditionally eaten during the Jewish holiday of Purim, while writing "the people of Israel will be liberated from their persecutors."

 

Identity in the Story of Purim - An Art Project

Earlier this month we offered a workshop in collaboration with CJM, Havruta in Art and Beyond: Collaboration and Creativity in the Classroom. As an exercise of collaboration across disciplines in preparation of the upcoming holiday, we chose two verses from the book of Esther as text for Havruta study. Participants engaged in text study, identified a "big idea" for Purim and translated it into a collaborative artwork. It was a small example of how to approach any Jewish theme that we revisit year after year, and how to interpret big (and sometime old) ideas in a new creative way. The resulting list of big ideas and art ideas suggested that this year several schools will be engaged in an art activity that is very different than past years.

We are happy to share with you the lesson outlinetext study,  guidelines for Havruta study, and a few examples of the artwork done as tunnel books

 

9Adar Project, a Jewish Week of Constructive Conflict

Compiled by Vavi Toran

 

Machloket (“Dispute for the Sake of Heaven” or Constructive Conflict) is among the great Jewish ideas.  Jews have been doing it for thousands of years.  We are grateful to our friends at the Pardes Center for Judaism and Conflict Resolution for creating the 9Adar Project, a Jewish Week of Constructive Conflict.  We are partnering with them to promote the study of Constructive Conflict here in Northern California, from February 12-20, 2016, culminating in the Feast of Jewish Learning on February 20th.

We have created this page to support you, our local educators as you find creative ideas and new pathways to bring the theme of constructive conflict to your classroom, through the lens of Israel. In addition to our resources below, you can find more resources and curricula about constructive conflict generally from the 9Adar Project in Jerusalem here.

We hope you find these resources useful and inspirational.

Four talked about the pine tree. 
One defined it by genus, species, and variety. 
One assessed its disadvantages for the lumber industry. 
One quoted poems about pine trees in many languages. 
One took root, stretched out branches, and rustled.
— Conversation (Sicha), a poem by Dan Pagis | Israeli Poet (1930-1986) | Translated by Rabbi Steven Sager

Machloket (Constructive Conflict) 

ARTS & CULTURE

The word Machloket in Hebrew shares its root chet-lamed-kuf with words that include: division, discord, partial, share, plot of land, smooth, slippery and flattery.

The road to constructive conflict, especially in Israel, has to be paved with honesty and respect for passionate people who don’t share the same opinions – in some cases about a plot of land.

Let’s make it a smooth rather than slippery process.

Here are a few examples how Israeli artists, poets, musicians and writers deal with machloket:

Two Elements a poem by Zelda
The poem represents a dialogue between the vocal and passionate flame and the silent and proud pine. How are these two elements alike and how are they different? Do we contain both the flame and the pine? Is this an inner conflict? What is the conflict about? Is this machloket solvable? How? How could a real dialogue between the two elements sound?
More about Zelda
 


There’s No Machloket
A song by Shalom Hanoch
(Hebrew lyrics)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis
Is this machloket really just a small misunderstanding? Perhaps if the two sides really listen to one another they will find they have a lot in common. With a biblical reference for a pastoral and peaceful future together, Shalom Hanoch moves from a misunderstanding between Ami and Tami to the more acute machloket between Ami and Sami, Sami and Zami.

A few things that might get lost in translation: Ami and Tami are the Hebrew equivalent of Hansel and Gretel, or two typical Israeli names. Ami can also be interpreted as “my people” or “my nation,” Mami is a common endearment, Sami might be a sephardic name, and Zami is an Arabic name.

There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
Get wet from the same rain
Live in the same country
Hate each other’s guts a bit
Cause each other a bit of trouble
Be a bit mean to each other, ‘cause basically
There is no Machloket
There is no Machloket
There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
Drink the same water
Take shelter under the same Schina (Divine Presence) 
Hurt each other a bit on the way
Attack only as a defense
And maybe it’s because that really
There is no Machloket
It’s just a small misunderstanding
There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
When we find King David
The picture will certainly change
We shall sit comfortably at home
Under a vine and the shade of a fig tree
We shall live in peace ‘cause basically
There is no Machloket
It’s just a small misunderstanding
A small misunderstanding
No Machloket
Between Ami and Tami
Between Tami and Ami
Between Ami and Mami
Between Mami and Sami
Between Sami and Zami
Between Ami and Sami
And Rami
And Ami
Between Ami and Tami
Between Tami and Ami
— Lyrics and Music: Shalom Hanoch

VISUAL ARTS

Visual artists express their opinions on canvas, walls or other media. Occasionally they have visual conversations and even banter in galleries or on city walls. We bring you a variety of art samples to explore and interpret.

David Reeb and Avner Bar Hama are artists who use the map of Israel in their artwork and present opposing political views. The questions they raise represent a central machloket in Israeli society – the issue is the Green Line and its inclusion or omission from official maps.

Green line by David Reeb
In the mid-1980s, the Green Line (which marks the pre-1967 borders of the State of Israel) became a dominant component of David Reeb’s paintings. His representation of this charged political frontier makes a statement about the permanent status the occupation acquired in Israeli consciousness.
Read More

 

Orange Map: Today Gush Katif – tomorrow Jaffa by Avner Bar Hama

Representing the opposing political view, Bar Hama presented a conceptual piece at (L)Attitudes in Washington DC portraying the map of Israel made entirely out of oranges.
Read More

 

Both Sides of Peace - Israeli and Palestinian Political Posters
Book Cover by Yossi Lemel

"Both sides try to get closer but hurt each other. The strings are in the colors of Palestinian and Israeli flags." -Yossi Lemel

Ironically, the metaphor for Israeli born Jews, the Sabra (cactus pear in Arabic)—prickly on the outside, sweet on the inside—is also an Arab symbol of resilience and tenacity, and is a natural fence that keeps in livestock and marks the boundaries of family lands.

 

The Face 2 Face Project
For this project, portraits of Israelis and Palestinians are pasted face to face, in monumental formats on both sides of the separation wall and in several Palestinian and Israeli cities.

More:
4 efforts to diffuse conflict in Israel with art
Peace and Conflict Through Graffiti

Other Resources:

New from the iCenter

APPROACHING CONFLICTS
Contexts, Perspectives, and Values in Israel Education

Approaching Conflicts is designed to help educators and learners engage sensitive material with more confidence, ask more questions, and challenge assumptions for the purpose of a strong and meaningful relationship with Israel.

STORIES WITH HAPPY ENDINGS
A Conversation Between Etgar Keret and Sayed Kashua

In the summer of 2014 – after a conflict that caused many Israelis, Jews and Arabs, to feel a growing despair for the possibilities of peace – prominent Israeli Palestinian writer Sayed Kashua announced his plans to immigrate to America. Afterwards, in a public exchange of letters, Kashua wrote to Etgar Keret, a popular Israeli Jewish author, to further discuss his decision. The two, longtime friends, discuss their lives and families among lingering possibilities of peace and coexistence while expressing exhaustion with continuing violence and conflict.

MORE RESOURCES

Encounter’s Communication Guidelines
Transforming conflict through face-to-face understanding

The guidelines serve as the blueprint for our common values.  They help to create a framework in which people of diverse ideological view­points can explore deeply contentious and charged topics respectfully. These guidelines enable questions to be framed in ways that speakers are able to hear, without feeling attacked, and reframing comments and statements into genuine questions.

Art Bridge

Creativity for Peace

image002.jpg

More 9Adar Resources can be found here.

To share additional resources, please comment below.


 

 

Experiential Educator Training Program with Yeshiva University now closed

Bay Area Experiential Jewish Education Regional Cohort November 2015 - January 2016

The YU Experiential Jewish Education Regional Cohorts are dynamic, multi-city professional development initiatives for regionally based Jewish educators, providing them with language, concepts and theories to deepen their practice and better their trade.

COURSE NOW CLOSED.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT ILAN VITEMBERG

ivitemberg@jewishlearningworks.org | 415.751.6983 x 149

or visit ejewisheducation.com

This professional development opportunity was a partnership between Jewish LearningWorks, Yeshiva University, The iCenter, and the Jewish Community Federation & Endowment Fund

*Time and location subject to change

Havruta in Art and Beyond - Collaboration and Creativity in the Classroom

This past week, Vavi Toran, our Arts and Culture Specialist hosted an Integration of the Arts in Jewish Education program in collaboration with CJM and an exhibiting artist at the museum.

When she introduced herself, the program and Jewish LearningWorks, she mentioned that last year we started the Integration of the Arts Initiative the room broke into spontaneous applause!

This day of learning had three parts that interconnected and intersected seamlessly, thanks to an excellent collaboration in envisioning and implementing between the CJM educational staff, the artist and myself.

The first part, led by CJM educators Fraidy Aber and Janine Okmim, drew upon an exhibit that sparked the idea for this workshop. Educators engaged in Havruta text study from books' passages used by the collaborating artists and visual text study of the resulting exhibition. 

The second part, led by artist Ascha Drake, introduced participants to her installation "In The Studio" (an inspiration for a "Maker's lab") and several of her integration projects with other disciplines in a school environment. She is also an art teacher at Bay School, and author of several books.

The third part led by me brought us back to Havruta text study. Taking into account that the next Jewish holiday on the calendar is Purim, I chose 2 verses from the book of Esther. Participants engaged in text study, identified a "big idea" for Purim and translated it into a collaborative art work. It was, in a way, a small example of how to approach anew any Jewish theme that we revisit year after year, and how to interpret big ideas in a creative way. 

Participants were very engaged, sharing insights and ideas, collaborating with either their colleagues or someone we matched them up with. Many beautiful and thoughtful art works were produced based on the learning of the day.

This is one example of the way we work behind the scenes to support our community of educators.

For more information on our Integration of the Arts Initiative, please email VToran@JewishLearningWorks.org


Jewish LearningWorks' Classic Israeli Tales Takes to the Jungle

While on vacation in Belize, Ilan Vitemberg, Director of Jewish LearningWorks' Israel Education Initiative, along with his partner, Peter and their cast of hand-made puppets performed their rollicking Hebrew/English adaptation of a classic Israeli story for school children in a Mayan village. 

Dira Le’haskir (Apartment for Rent) brings to life the most beloved Israeli children story of all time. An allegory to be sure, the story, by Leah Goldberg, focuses on many species of animals who, despite their differences, find a way to live together in harmony. Laden with donations of school supplies from the staff at Jewish LearningWorks Ilan and Peter were received with open arms and ear to ear grins.
This beloved story is part of Jewish LearningWorks' Classic Israeli Bookshelf and is performed all across the Bay Area, in day schools, synagogue schools and at the Jewish Community Library.

Opinions, Opinions, Opinions

Shalom Educators,
Many of us get most of our news and form our opinions from our preferred press sources. Some of us read the newspaper in the morning, some listen to the radio on their way to work and some watch the evening news. Recently we heard on Israel's TV channel 10 (preferred press source), that most young Americans get their news and form their opinions based on watching Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, from their friends' posts on social media sites and from tweets by celebrities rather than news commentators. 

Here are a few resources that have to do with opinions rather than news. They are a testament to the complicated issues we face, and explain in a way the heated arguments that happen daily here and in Israel.

We are sorry if this only adds to the confusion rather than solves it. Unfortunately, this is the nature of this very long and painful conflict. 
What's your opinion??
All the best and let's continue to hope...

David Grossman's "End the Grindstone of Israeli-Palestinian Violence". published in Yediot Ahronot.

Jon Stewart The Daily Show, We Need to Talk About Israel 

Extended Interview with Hillary Clinton

Ha'aretz Opinion Pages

Ynet (Yediot Ahronot) Opinion Pages

Amos Biderman
Daily caricature
The caption reads: Failure of Humanitarian Cease Fire 
The comic depicts opposing sides in Israel (on the right activists against continuing the Gaza operation and on the left for continuing the operation)
Web page for Ha'aretz Daily caricatures: 

Shalom from Tel Aviv, where life seems to run at 50%

Shalom to all of you from Tel Aviv where life seems to run at 50%. 

Last night we had to rush home in a cab from La La Land, our favorite beachfront cafe, in time to brace the promised barrage of missiles from Gaza. 

They arrived as promised  and the whole experience was very disconcerting. 

It is not that we are scared for our lives, but it takes constant planning of where we'll be and where is the Secure Area (where you need to be in about a minute after the air raid sirens wail). We even have to decide which PJ to wear in order to be presentable if we have to join a bunch of strange neighbors in the stairway in the middle of the night...

We received many concerned emails, Skype and some phone calls from family, friends, colleagues and we thank each and every one of you.

We are definitely OK and doing what all other Israelis do - continue as normal as possible. We are combining work and play, which in my case are sometimes one and the same. 

Today we went to Jaffa's flea market in search of old maps and had lunch at Pua - Chopped liver with horseradish and Challah and lentil salad with Tehini. Delicious!

Our short rest at home was interrupted by another air raid, but we refuse to stay put and are going to a play at the Cameri Theatre tonight. 

Later this week... A graffiti tour of florentine neighborhood, cartoon art museum meeting with the archivist, tour of story gardens in Holon (Classic Israeli tales as playgrounds for kids!), and more!

We miss you and will be happy to come home soon...

An Update from Israel by Vavi Toran

 

 

Honoring Their Memories & Moving Forward

Dear Friends,

Yesterday we received the tragic news that Naftali Frenkel, Gilad Shaar, and Eyal Yifrach will not be returning to their families alive. For the last two weeks we have felt these boys to be our own. We were unified in solidarity with them and their families, and we are unified in our grief.

 

As educators and as parents, these events pose challenges to us - how do we address such tragedies in our teaching? What do our students need from us? 

We've compiled a few resources that may be helpful to teachers, camp counselors, youth group leaders, and parents. Some of these address helping young people cope with loss and terror, and some of them help to address some of the toughest questions this tragedy raises. Many of these are not explicitly labeled for specific ages - so we must use our judgment as to what is age appropriate.

I'm sharing this with a wider list than only our educators for a couple of reasons. Many of us are parents and these resources could be helpful to parents as well as educators. And, I suspect that young people are not the only ones who may have some difficulty in sorting out their thoughts and feelings. In my experience, we often feel frustrated and powerless in the aftermath of such events, and those feelings of powerlessness can take us in many directions. Not all of those directions are healthy or useful. Some of these resources may be of help to all of us.

And, there is one other reason.

That all of us are in some state of shock or mourning for three boys we never met says something about us, and about our relationship with one another. We all feel this loss; we all feel, in some way, that we lost family. Because, in some way, we did.

We don't have a shiva service to attend and we are not in direct relationship with the Frenkel, Shaar, and Yifrach families. And yet, most of us feel the need to do something, to reach out to someone. I've been struck by all the emails I've received from Jewish organizations mourning the loss of these three boys; and all the Facebook posts of friends. I think, in some way, we all have a need to grieve together, to give and to receive strength and comfort from each other. That is what happens with families who experience loss. That is part of what peoplehood is about.

  Location: Israeli soldiers stand near the area where the three Israeli teenagers' bodies were found yesterday.   The rural track is just outside the village of Halhul, a few miles north of the West Bank city of Hebron               Photo Credit: DailyMail

Location: Israeli soldiers stand near the area where the three Israeli teenagers' bodies were found yesterday.
The rural track is just outside the village of Halhul, a few miles north of the West Bank city of Hebron             Photo Credit: DailyMail

So, here's our expression of condolence. Because we are educators, we honor their memory by remembering them and by sharing what knowledge and wisdom we can gather. If you can use these resources - please do so, and, in your teaching or parenting - honor the memory of Naftali, Gilad and Eyal. For those of us who are parents, we might use this opportunity to embrace our children and remind them that they are loved and that they are safe. And for those of us who whose hearts have been broken yet again, may we all be comforted among the mourners of Zion, may we comfort one another, and may the memories of Naftali, Gilad, and Eyal be as a blessing.

RESOURCES

 

From our colleagues at the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland, this excellent compendium for Responding to Crisis.

From our friends at the iCenter, this guide with resources for discussing tragedy in Israel.

From the Lookstein Center for Jewish Education at Bar Ilan University in Israel, this Islands of Resiliency site focuses on dealing assisting children in dealing with crisis and tragedy.

From Yeshiva University - this article on helping children and adolescents cope with loss and terror.

We hope some of these may help. If you know other other good resources, please let us know so we can share them with other educators.

 

David Waksberg

Jewish LearningWorks | Chief Executive Officer

Israel Education, Every Day

On Yom Ha’atsmaut our community comes together to celebrate Israel, making now the perfect time to highlight the Israel education work happening here at Jewish LearningWorks each and every day, all year long.

With the support of generous funders including the Jim Joseph Foundation and the Goldman Fund, we have developed innovative new approaches to Israel education, partnering with educators and schools across Northern California.

That work includes:

  • Israel Educators Network – Community of Practice for Israel educators throughout Northern California
  • Summer Israel Seminar for Jewish Educators – brings educators to Israel for an intensive two-week seminar to fuel their pedagogy;
  • Tractate: Independence – ground-breaking  Israel curriculum for teens and young adults.  In pilot phase with nine schools (day and synagogue ) here, in Northern California;
  • Classic Israeli Tales – curriculum introduces elementary and pre-school aged Americans to Israeli children’s stories;
  • Educational exhibits, curricula and resources: Poster Tales, Apartment for Rent, Coexistence, , Tel Aviv Exploration, Theodore Herzl, and more;
  • Israel Education e-newsletter – monthly resources for hundreds of Bay Area educators.

To learn more about this work or to take advantage of support, email IVitemberg@Jewishlearningworks.org