Professional Development

As 'Evan Hansen' arrives in S.F., lessons in teen social media literacy

As 'Evan Hansen' arrives in S.F., lessons in teen social media literacy - J.

The goal of the JCC of San Francisco's Teen Arts Immersion Program is to have life imitate art. TAIP brings teens to a musical twice a semester and uses that experience as a springboard to discuss issues such as empathy and inclusion. About 60 teens in the program went to the traveling Broadway musical "Dear ...

A Message from Our CEO

A Message from Our CEO

Soon I’ll be in my backyard, building my rickety old sukkah, laying palm fronds on its roof, trying not to kill myself with a falling beam, cursing out my clumsiness and the thorns or splinters that come my way. My sukkah-building has been the butt of family jokes for decades. But no one complains as they dine among the decorations on a beautiful autumn evening. I love Sukkot’s earthiness, the glow of Hanukkah’s candles piercing winter’s darkness, and singing until our voices give out at our Passover Seder. Each festival brings unbridled joy, celebrated in the warm company of family, friends, and community. 

Resources: Middot (Virtues), Mussar, and Preparing for the Days of Awe

Lists of Middot

Pirke Avot:
“The Torah is greater than the priesthood and greater than royalty, seeing that royalty is acquired through 30 virtues, the priesthood twenty-four, while the Torah is acquired through 48 virtues.”

These 48 Middot are listed here on the URJ website: http://www.reformjudaism.org/study-48-middot

Cheshbon Ha-Nefesh
Rabbi Mendel Menachem Lefin of Satanov identified 13 Middot in Cheshbon HaNefesh (Accounting of the Soul), published 200 years ago in Lithuania.

Benjamin Franklin
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Lefin was influenced by reading Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography.  Franklin listed these 13 virtues, along with a rigorous method for self-improvement.  Franklin’s methods may have had an influence on subsequently developed Mussar practice.

A comparison of Franklin’s list of virtues with the 13 Middot in Cheshbon Ha0Nefesh, and the 13 Middot listed by Rabbi Israel Salanter, the founder of the modern Mussar movement, can be found here.

National Mussar Resources

The two leading centers of Mussar learning in North America are The Mussar Institute and the Mussar Leadership Program.

Local Mussar Resources

http://bayareamussar.org/ - aggregates information about Mussar classes and events across the Bay Area.

Cheshbon HaNefesh (Accounting of the Soul) Preparing for the Days of Awe


Personal Improving through Personal Accounting
Cheshbon Hanefesh (from shortvort.com) 
10 Tools for Cheshbon HaNefesh
Accounting of the Soul template/worksheet

9Adar Project, a Jewish Week of Constructive Conflict

Compiled by Vavi Toran

 

Machloket (“Dispute for the Sake of Heaven” or Constructive Conflict) is among the great Jewish ideas.  Jews have been doing it for thousands of years.  We are grateful to our friends at the Pardes Center for Judaism and Conflict Resolution for creating the 9Adar Project, a Jewish Week of Constructive Conflict.  We are partnering with them to promote the study of Constructive Conflict here in Northern California, from February 12-20, 2016, culminating in the Feast of Jewish Learning on February 20th.

We have created this page to support you, our local educators as you find creative ideas and new pathways to bring the theme of constructive conflict to your classroom, through the lens of Israel. In addition to our resources below, you can find more resources and curricula about constructive conflict generally from the 9Adar Project in Jerusalem here.

We hope you find these resources useful and inspirational.

Four talked about the pine tree. 
One defined it by genus, species, and variety. 
One assessed its disadvantages for the lumber industry. 
One quoted poems about pine trees in many languages. 
One took root, stretched out branches, and rustled.
— Conversation (Sicha), a poem by Dan Pagis | Israeli Poet (1930-1986) | Translated by Rabbi Steven Sager

Machloket (Constructive Conflict) 

ARTS & CULTURE

The word Machloket in Hebrew shares its root chet-lamed-kuf with words that include: division, discord, partial, share, plot of land, smooth, slippery and flattery.

The road to constructive conflict, especially in Israel, has to be paved with honesty and respect for passionate people who don’t share the same opinions – in some cases about a plot of land.

Let’s make it a smooth rather than slippery process.

Here are a few examples how Israeli artists, poets, musicians and writers deal with machloket:

Two Elements a poem by Zelda
The poem represents a dialogue between the vocal and passionate flame and the silent and proud pine. How are these two elements alike and how are they different? Do we contain both the flame and the pine? Is this an inner conflict? What is the conflict about? Is this machloket solvable? How? How could a real dialogue between the two elements sound?
More about Zelda
 


There’s No Machloket
A song by Shalom Hanoch
(Hebrew lyrics)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis
Is this machloket really just a small misunderstanding? Perhaps if the two sides really listen to one another they will find they have a lot in common. With a biblical reference for a pastoral and peaceful future together, Shalom Hanoch moves from a misunderstanding between Ami and Tami to the more acute machloket between Ami and Sami, Sami and Zami.

A few things that might get lost in translation: Ami and Tami are the Hebrew equivalent of Hansel and Gretel, or two typical Israeli names. Ami can also be interpreted as “my people” or “my nation,” Mami is a common endearment, Sami might be a sephardic name, and Zami is an Arabic name.

There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
Get wet from the same rain
Live in the same country
Hate each other’s guts a bit
Cause each other a bit of trouble
Be a bit mean to each other, ‘cause basically
There is no Machloket
There is no Machloket
There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
Drink the same water
Take shelter under the same Schina (Divine Presence) 
Hurt each other a bit on the way
Attack only as a defense
And maybe it’s because that really
There is no Machloket
It’s just a small misunderstanding
There is no Machloket between Ami and Tami
It’s just a small misunderstanding
When we find King David
The picture will certainly change
We shall sit comfortably at home
Under a vine and the shade of a fig tree
We shall live in peace ‘cause basically
There is no Machloket
It’s just a small misunderstanding
A small misunderstanding
No Machloket
Between Ami and Tami
Between Tami and Ami
Between Ami and Mami
Between Mami and Sami
Between Sami and Zami
Between Ami and Sami
And Rami
And Ami
Between Ami and Tami
Between Tami and Ami
— Lyrics and Music: Shalom Hanoch

VISUAL ARTS

Visual artists express their opinions on canvas, walls or other media. Occasionally they have visual conversations and even banter in galleries or on city walls. We bring you a variety of art samples to explore and interpret.

David Reeb and Avner Bar Hama are artists who use the map of Israel in their artwork and present opposing political views. The questions they raise represent a central machloket in Israeli society – the issue is the Green Line and its inclusion or omission from official maps.

Green line by David Reeb
In the mid-1980s, the Green Line (which marks the pre-1967 borders of the State of Israel) became a dominant component of David Reeb’s paintings. His representation of this charged political frontier makes a statement about the permanent status the occupation acquired in Israeli consciousness.
Read More

 

Orange Map: Today Gush Katif – tomorrow Jaffa by Avner Bar Hama

Representing the opposing political view, Bar Hama presented a conceptual piece at (L)Attitudes in Washington DC portraying the map of Israel made entirely out of oranges.
Read More

 

Both Sides of Peace - Israeli and Palestinian Political Posters
Book Cover by Yossi Lemel

"Both sides try to get closer but hurt each other. The strings are in the colors of Palestinian and Israeli flags." -Yossi Lemel

Ironically, the metaphor for Israeli born Jews, the Sabra (cactus pear in Arabic)—prickly on the outside, sweet on the inside—is also an Arab symbol of resilience and tenacity, and is a natural fence that keeps in livestock and marks the boundaries of family lands.

 

The Face 2 Face Project
For this project, portraits of Israelis and Palestinians are pasted face to face, in monumental formats on both sides of the separation wall and in several Palestinian and Israeli cities.

More:
4 efforts to diffuse conflict in Israel with art
Peace and Conflict Through Graffiti

Other Resources:

New from the iCenter

APPROACHING CONFLICTS
Contexts, Perspectives, and Values in Israel Education

Approaching Conflicts is designed to help educators and learners engage sensitive material with more confidence, ask more questions, and challenge assumptions for the purpose of a strong and meaningful relationship with Israel.

STORIES WITH HAPPY ENDINGS
A Conversation Between Etgar Keret and Sayed Kashua

In the summer of 2014 – after a conflict that caused many Israelis, Jews and Arabs, to feel a growing despair for the possibilities of peace – prominent Israeli Palestinian writer Sayed Kashua announced his plans to immigrate to America. Afterwards, in a public exchange of letters, Kashua wrote to Etgar Keret, a popular Israeli Jewish author, to further discuss his decision. The two, longtime friends, discuss their lives and families among lingering possibilities of peace and coexistence while expressing exhaustion with continuing violence and conflict.

MORE RESOURCES

Encounter’s Communication Guidelines
Transforming conflict through face-to-face understanding

The guidelines serve as the blueprint for our common values.  They help to create a framework in which people of diverse ideological view­points can explore deeply contentious and charged topics respectfully. These guidelines enable questions to be framed in ways that speakers are able to hear, without feeling attacked, and reframing comments and statements into genuine questions.

Art Bridge

Creativity for Peace

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More 9Adar Resources can be found here.

To share additional resources, please comment below.


 

 

Beyond Silence: Special Invitation

We are proud to partner on such an important day of learning and professional development.  If you work with kids or teens in any capacity, we urge you to gather your colleagues and sign up today.

Jewish Professional Development Day Focusing on Child Sexual Abuse

Wednesday, November 18th 8:30am – 4:00pm
at Peninsula Temple Sholom, 1655 Sebastian Drive, Burlingame

Child sexual abuse occurs in every community. One in four women and one in six men report having been sexually abused before age 18. As Jewish professionals, we encounter children and adults who are impacted by child sexual abuse every day. Guided by our Jewish values, this day will be dedicated to move beyond silence to create a culture of care and action in our community.

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THIS IMPORTANT OPPORTUNITY

Beyond Silence will help you:

  • Increase your knowledge of child sexual abuse
  • Understand legal, ethical and Jewish value-based responsibilities with regard to child sexual abuse
  • Know what to do when/if abuse is disclosed or suspected in your Jewish communal setting
  • Gain concrete tools for how to talk to survivors, understand what helps survivors disclose and provide Jewish spiritual care
  • Implement policies, practices and protocols for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse within the Jewish institutional context
  • Be motivated to bring this knowledge back to your organization and to integrate information and training/education within your staff

Additional Information
BeyondSilence@BAJHC.org or (415) 629-9841

Click Here to Register

 

Beyond Silence would like to thank the Lisa & John Pritzker Family Fund, the Walter & Elise Haas Fund, and the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties for their generous support.

Experiential Educator Training Program with Yeshiva University now closed

Bay Area Experiential Jewish Education Regional Cohort November 2015 - January 2016

The YU Experiential Jewish Education Regional Cohorts are dynamic, multi-city professional development initiatives for regionally based Jewish educators, providing them with language, concepts and theories to deepen their practice and better their trade.

COURSE NOW CLOSED.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT ILAN VITEMBERG

ivitemberg@jewishlearningworks.org | 415.751.6983 x 149

or visit ejewisheducation.com

This professional development opportunity was a partnership between Jewish LearningWorks, Yeshiva University, The iCenter, and the Jewish Community Federation & Endowment Fund

*Time and location subject to change

Integration of the Arts in Jewish Education

Do the arts play a role in your classroom? Are the teachers and students in your school aware that text is not always verbal? Do the schools harness the power of the arts by integrating them into their Jewish Studies curriculum and practice?

Jewish LearningWorks believes in the ability of the Arts to provide a gateway to inspired and joyful learning, a perspective for complex issues, and a pedagogical approach that fosters creative expression, critical thinking, and collaboration. In Jewish Education the arts create new ways to engage with and to understand text, values, history, culture and community.

By integrating the Arts in Jewish education, we seek to enrich and increase Jewish identity and Jewish knowledge for Bay Area learners of all ages.

The initiative is launched with a needs assessment survey, a traveling exhibition and a headlining event.